hi ther for today some areee......

NEWS 01:-
LockMart F-35 CatBIRD Shows Key Avionics Capability And Reliability


The Lockheed Martin Joint Strike Fighter Cooperative Avionics Test Bed ("CATBird") aircraft recently completed a two-week deployment to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., where it demonstrated the robust qualities of avionics systems being developed for the F-35 Lightning II.
The deployment included successful airborne testing of the F-35 Lightning II radar, electronic warfare and communications/navigation/identification systems and more than 2.8 million lines of mission systems flight software. The testing reduces hardware and software risks that cannot be retired in ground laboratories and individual sensor test beds before testing of the first mission systems equipped F-35 aircraft later this year.
CATBird, a highly modified 737 airliner equipped with the integrated F-35 mission systems suite, left for Edwards on April 14 and returned to Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth plant as planned on April 24. During the deployment, CATBird conducted 10 mission systems test flights successfully evaluating the radar, CNI, and EW infrastructure and sensor function.
The joint industry/government F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB provided logistic support, ranges, and ground and air targets.
"Performance of the aircraft infrastructure and on-board sensors exceeded my expectations and gives the test team added confidence that we are on track to fly the first mission systems F-35 aircraft this summer," said Doug Pearson, Lockheed Martin vice president of the F-35 Integrated Test Force. "The deployment was superbly supported by the Air Force Flight Test Center."
Airborne avionics testing aboard the CATBird and other flying test beds is under way concurrently with ongoing validation in ground-based laboratories that has amassed tens of thousands of hours of testing time.
The F-35 will have the most comprehensive and powerful avionics suite of any fighter in history, with a Northrop Grumman active electronically scanned array radar, electro-optical distributed aperture system and CNI system; a Lockheed Martin electro-optical targeting system; a BAE Systems electronic warfare system; and other advanced systems providing information that is totally integrated before being presented to the pilot on a VSI helmet-mounted display and a touch-screen glass cockpit display.
The F-35 is a supersonic, multi-role, 5th generation stealth fighter. Three variants derived from a common design, developed together and using the same sustainment infrastructure worldwide will replace at least 13 types of aircraft for 11 nations initially, making the Lightning II the most cost-effective fighter program in history.



NEWS 02:-
Raytheon Awarded Contract For Additional Patriot Pure Fleet Upgrades


Raytheon has been awarded a new contract to continue "Pure Fleet" upgrades of U.S. Army Patriot Air and Missile Defense Systems.
The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command contract provides $115 million to upgrade four additional U.S. Army Patriot Air and Missile Defense Systems to Configuration-3 status. The upgrades involve enhancements to Patriot system ground components, particularly the radar.
The contract option supports a "Grow the Army" initiative of equipping an additional Patriot battalion with a state-of-the-art Configuration-3 Patriot system.
"This contract is significant for two reasons," said Joseph "Skip" Garrett, vice president and deputy for Patriot Programs at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems (IDS). "Continuing Pure Fleet upgrades ensures our warfighters have the latest and best technology to meet evolving threats.
"Equipping a new Patriot battalion with a Configuration-3 system provides the Army with additional capability and flexibility to meet air defense requirements wherever needed," Garrett said. "Both the upgrades and the addition of a new Configuration-3 battalion are extremely important."
Raytheon IDS is the prime contractor for both domestic and international Patriot Air and Missile Defense Systems and systems integrator for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles.


NEWS 03:-
Captive Flight Test Moves NLOS-LS Closer To US Navy Live Fire Testing


NetFires has conducted the second captive flight test of the Non Line-of-Sight-Launch System Precision Attack Missile (PAM).
NLOS-LS provides the warfighter with immediate, precise and responsive fires on high-payoff targets with real-time target acquisition and battle effects. It is also one of the key Littoral Combat Ship mission modules.
"As a key part of the LCS 'layered' surface warfare capability, NLOS-LS counters the small-boat threat," said Capt. Mike Good, U.S. Navy program manager for the Littoral Combat Ship Mission Modules.
"The success of this captive flight test increases our confidence in the over-water capability of these missiles. Combined with the recent successful U.S. Army guided tests, these are important steps toward the Navy-guided flight tests scheduled for later this year."
The LCS Mission Module can fire as many as 45 NLOS-LS PAM missiles from three container launch units. With a range greater than 25 miles, the PAM missile gives the LCS an increased surface warfare weapon capability.
"These tests prove the plug-and-play missile seeker ability to detect and track targets while filling the warfighter's capability gap for precision engagement of moving and stationary targets in open and complex terrain," said Scott Speet, executive vice president of NetFires LLC and Raytheon's NLOS-LS program director.



NEWS 04:-
Rise Of Oxygen Caused Earth's Earliest Ice Age


An international team of geologists may have uncovered the answer to an age-old question - an ice-age-old question, that is. It appears that Earth's earliest ice age may have been due to the rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, which consumed atmospheric greenhouse gases and chilled the earth.
Scientists from the University of Maryland, including post-doctoral fellows Boswell Wing and Sang-Tae Kim, graduate student Margaret Baker, and professors Alan J. Kaufman and James Farquhar, along with colleagues in Germany, South Africa, Canada and the United States, uncovered evidence that the oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere - generally known as the Great Oxygenation Event - coincided with the first widespread ice age on the planet.
"We can now put our hands on the rock library that preserves evidence of irreversible atmospheric change," said Kaufman. "This singular event had a profound effect on the climate, and also on life."
Using sulfur isotopes to determine the oxygen content of ~2.3 billion year-old rocks in the Transvaal Supergroup in South Africa, they found evidence of a sudden increase in atmospheric oxygen that broadly coincided with physical evidence of glacial debris, and geochemical evidence of a new world-order for the carbon cycle.
"The sulfur isotope change we recorded coincided with the first known anomaly in the carbon cycle. This may have resulted from the diversification of photosynthetic life that produced the oxygen that changed the atmosphere," Kaufman said.
Two and a half billion years ago, before the Earth's atmosphere contained appreciable oxygen, photosynthetic bacteria gave off oxygen that first likely oxygenated the surface of the ocean, and only later the atmosphere.
The first formed oxygen reacted with iron in the oceans, creating iron oxides that settled to the ocean floor in sediments called banded iron-formations - layered deposits of red-brown rock that accumulated in ocean basins worldwide. Later, once the iron was used up, oxygen escaped from the oceans and started filling up the atmosphere.
Once oxygen made it into the atmosphere, the scientists suggest that it reacted with methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, to form carbon dioxide, which is 62 times less effective at warming the surface of the planet. "With less warming potential, surface temperatures may have plummeted, resulting in globe-encompassing glaciers and sea ice" said Kaufman.
In addition to its affect on climate, the rise in oxygen stimulated the rise in stratospheric ozone, our global sunscreen. This gas layer, which lies between 12 and 30 miles above the surface, decreased the amount of damaging ultraviolet sunrays reaching the oceans, allowing photosynthetic organisms that previously lived deeper down, to move up to the surface, and hence increase their output of oxygen, further building up stratospheric ozone.
"New oxygen in the atmosphere would also have stimulated weathering processes, delivering more nutrients to the seas, and may have also pushed biological evolution towards eukaryotes, which require free oxygen for important biosynthetic pathways," said Kaufman.
The result of the Great Oxidation Event, according to Kaufman and his colleagues, was a complete transformation of Earth's atmosphere, of its climate, and of the life that populated its surface. The study is published in the May issue of Geology.



NEWS 05:-
Ore. Babies Switched at Birth Meet 56 Years Later

On a spring day in 1953, two babies were born at Pioneer Memorial Hospital in the Eastern Oregon town of Heppner — DeeAnn Angell of Fossil and Kay Rene Reed of Condon. The girls would grow up, get married, have kids of their own and become grandparents. Then, last summer, Kay Rene's brother, Bobby Reed, got a call from an 86-year-old woman who had known his mother and had also lived next door to the Angell family in Fossil.
"She said she had something she had to get off her chest," Bobby Reed said in an interview with the East Oregonian newspaper of Pendleton, which reported the story Sunday.
Bobby met the woman at the nursing home where she lives. The woman said Marjorie Angell insisted back in 1953 that she had been given the wrong baby after the nurses returned from bathing them. Her concerns, however, were brushed off.
Then the old lady showed Bobby an old photo.
"It looked like Kay Rene in about 7th or 8th grade," Bobby said.
But it was DeeAnn Angell's sister.
"Kay Rene is not a Reed," the woman insisted. "DeeAnn is a Reed."
Bobby, obviously stunned, didn't know what to do with the information. He didn't want to hurt anyone; he didn't want anything to change.
He finally decided to tell his two oldest sisters, and one of them told Kay Rene.
With both sets of parents dead, the Reed and Angell siblings compared notes and family stories, learning that rumors of a mix-up had been around for years. In early February, DeeAnn got a call from her sister, Juanita. "Do you remember those rumors of being switched at birth?" Juanita asked, and went on to provide the update.
"Does this mean I'm not invited to the family reunion?" DeeAnn joked.
Kay Rene, meanwhile, needed to learn the truth. Kay Rene, Bobby and their sister Dorothy met DeeAnn at a Kennewick, Wash., clinic last month. The doctor said Kay Rene's and DeeAnn's DNA would be compared with that of Bobby and Dorothy to determine the probability of a relation.
A week later, Kay Rene got the results at work. She went to her car to open the envelope in privacy. Her likely probability of being related to her brother and sister? Zero.
"I cried," she said. "I wanted to be a Reed — my life wasn't my life."
DeeAnn's report said she had 99.9 percent of being related to Bobby and Dorothy.
DeeAnn, who now lives in Richland, Wash., told the newspaper that the report only confirmed what she knew after meeting Kay Rene.
"After seeing Kay Rene, I went home and told my husband, I don't know why she's doing the DNA testing," she said. "I was shocked — she looked just like my sister's twin."
Pioneer Memorial Hospital offered to pay for counseling, but both women declined.
The two have become friends and celebrated their latest birthday together earlier this month. Recently, Kay Rene Qualls introduced DeeAnn Shafer to her work colleagues, calling her "my swister."
"I'm trying to move forward at look at the positive," DeeAnn said. "I love my kids. I love my husband. I love my life."
She paused. "You can't look back. It just drives you crazy."


NEWS 06:-
'Star Trek' Has Galactic $76.5M Opening Weekend

"Star Trek" beamed itself up to the top of the box office, earning $76.5 million in its opening weekend. Paramount Pictures had estimated that the movie would make about $50 million for the weekend, but figured that strong reviews helped carry it to the bigger opening.
Director J.J. Abrams' reboot of the beloved sci-fi franchise made $72.5 million from Friday through Sunday, plus $4 million just in pre-midnight screenings Thursday, the studio said Saturday. That cumulative figure includes a record $8.2 million in IMAX showings.
"Star Trek," which reveals the back stories of Capt. Kirk, Mr. Spock and the rest of the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise, is an unusual blockbuster that pleased critics, too, receiving 96 percent positive reviews on the Rotten Tomatoes Web site.
"Last year 'The Dark Knight' and 'Iron Man' both were embraced by critics as incredible filmmaking as well as big action-adventure movies. This one has been even better reviewed," said Paramount vice chairman Rob Moore. "You look at the level of critical response and the audience reaction, we definitely feel like the movie is set to play into Memorial Day and into the summer."
Moore said he expected the movie, which had a $140 million budget, should gross over $200 million total this summer, even with competition like "Terminator: Salvation" coming on May 21 and "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" arriving in theaters July 15.
Abrams got it right, he said, by appealing to both hardcore "Star Trek" fans as well as moviegoers who may not have been familiar with the 1960s television series and the many movies and TV spin-offs it spawned. It stars Chris Pine as Kirk and Zachary Quinto as Spock, and features an appearance by Leonard Nimoy as an older version of the half-Vulcan, half-human Spock.
"It just shows you how talented he is and what a great movie he made," Moore said.
"Star Trek" also beat the $6.3 million record "The Dark Knight" set in its opening weekend on IMAX screens last year.
"The DNA of this movie and the DNA of the `Star Trek' franchise work perfectly together and are very much a complement to what IMAX has accomplished," said Greg Foster, chairman and president of IMAX Filmed Entertainment. "IMAX was a company that had a sort of older-school, older-fashioned approach to things and we hipped it up and reinvented ourselves, if you will. That's precisely what J.J. Abrams and Paramount did with 'Star Trek.'" The fact that the "Star Trek" haul improved from $26.8 million on Friday to $27.4 million on Saturday is a good sign, said Paul Dergarabedian, a box-office analyst.
"Sometimes you will see a movie drop big-time," Dergarabedian said. "What this 'Star Trek' is going to have is legs, a rare commodity in this world where every week there's a new blockbuster."
As expected, last week's top film, "X-Men Origins: Wolverine," came in at No. 2 with $27 million. The prequel to the "X-Men" franchise, starring Hugh Jackman as the mutant who slices and dices his enemies with his metal claws, has made nearly $129.6 million in two weeks.
"It's the same weekend drop as ('X-Men: The Last Stand'), the last one. That tends to be what fan-based movies do," said Chris Aronson, senior vice president of domestic distribution for 20th Century Fox. "To have $130 million in the first 10 days is sensational. We think we withstood the attack of 'Star Trek,' if you will, and will settle into a long, successful run."
The week's other new wide release, the stoner comedy "Next Day Air," came in at sixth place with $4 million.
Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to sources. Final figures will be released Monday.
1. "Star Trek," $72.5 million.
2. "X-Men Origins: Wolverine," $27 million.
3. "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past," $10.45 million.
4. "Obsessed," $6.6 million.
5. "17 Again," $4.4 million.
6. "Next Day Air," $4 million.


NEWS 07:-
Sunscreens You'll Love to Wear

Despite elegant new formulations and innovative packaging that makes sunscreen application a snap, too much skin is still going uncovered. In a 2008 survey by Coppertone, nearly half of respondents admitted they didn't wear sunscreen at all. Until now, that is. Prepare to excuse-proof your sunscreen use!
Excuse: "Sunscreen breaks me out"

The Truth: Fear of aggravating acne is the No. 1 reason women shun sunscreen, says Dr. Robert A. Weiss, president of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. But guess what? Protecting skin from UV light curtails future breakouts. "The sun stimulates oil glands and thickens skin, so pores become blocked," explains Weiss.

Problem Solver: Keep breakouts at bay with a lightweight, nonoily lotion like Coppertone NutraShield Faces 70+ SPF with Dual Defense ($10.50; drugstores), which is proven not to clog pores.

The Truth: Not freshening your sunscreen is akin to committing skin suicide. Here's why: The potency of sunscreen decreases after a couple of hours, and a mere 10 minutes of daily exposure to aging UVA rays is known to cause changes that lead to wrinkles and brown spots within a few months.

Problem Solver: A brush-on tinted mineral sunscreen powder such as BareMinerals SPF 30 Natural Sunscreen ($28 is perfect for quick touch-ups before dashing out to lunch or running errands midday. Besides helping to even out your skin tone, the minerals naturally diffuse light, so your complexion looks smoother and more luminous.


NEWS 08:-
Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough

Mascoma has announced that the company has made major research advances in consolidated bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass.
CBP avoids the need for the costly production of cellulase enzymes by using engineered microorganisms that produce cellulases and ethanol at high yield in a single step.
"This is a true breakthrough that takes us much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State University's Dr. Bruce Dale, who is also Editor of the journal Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefineries.
"Many had thought that CBP was years or even decades away, but the future just arrived. Mascoma has permanently changed the biofuels landscape from here on."
In a recent Forbes article, biofuels expert Helena Chum of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, commented on CBP, saying "This is the golden dream. All of the processes in one super-organism. That would be the lowest cost possible."
A prominent DOE/USDA research agenda states that "CBP is widely considered to be the ultimate low-cost configuration for cellulose hydrolysis and fermentation."
Multiple research advances presented by Mascoma Chief Technology Officer Dr. Mike Ladisch at the 31st Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals in San Francisco provide proof of concept for CBP. These include advances with both bacteria that grow at high temperatures, called thermophiles, and recombinant cellulolytic yeasts such as:
Thermophilic Bacteria
+ Production of nearly 6% wt/vol ethanol by an engineered thermophilie, an increase of 60% over what was reported just a year ago;
+ The first report of targeted metabolic engineering of a cellulose-fermenting thermophile, Clostridium thermocellum, leading to a reduced production of unwanted organic acid byproducts; and
+ Selected strains of C. thermocellum that can rapidly consume cellulose with high conversion and no added cellulase, and grow on cellulose in the presence of commercial levels of ethanol.
Recombinant, Cellulolytic Yeast
+ 3,000-fold increase in cellulase expression;
+ A significant 2.5-fold reduction in the added cellulase required for conversion of pretreated hardwood to ethanol; and
+ Complete elimination of added cellulase for conversion of waste paper sludge to ethanol.
"These advances enable the reduction in operating and capital costs required for cost-effective commercial production of ethanol, bringing Mascoma substantially closer to commercialization," said Jim Flatt, Executive Vice President of Research, Development and Operations at Mascoma.
"Our results go a long way toward establishing the feasibility of the processing concept that we have built our company around - so this is a big day for us."
In February 2009, Mascoma announced that its pilot facility in Rome, NY had begun producing cellulosic ethanol.
The demonstration facility, which was constructed with the generous support from the State of New York through the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, has the flexibility to run on numerous biomass feedstocks including wood chips, tall grasses, corn stover (residual corn stalks) and sugar cane bagasse.
The facility will provide process performance engineering data sufficient to support construction of 1/10th scale and commercial scale biorefineries in Kinross, MI, with support from the Department of Energy and State of Michigan.


NEWS 09:-
Bay Area's Largest Beverage Distributor Now Sun-Powered

Bay Area Beverage Company has flipped the switch on a 500 kW solar power system, one of the largest in region. The company - representing the brands of more than 20 suppliers and distributing more than seven million cases annually - now generates 100 per cent of its electricity with solar power.

Commuters on Highway 580 will find the more than 2,756 modules now perched atop the company's massive facilities hard to miss. The system - large enough to power 85 homes - was designed by San Francisco-based Sunlight Electric.

"For us, going solar isn't just about 'doing the right thing' - it's good business as well," says Bay Area Beverage Company President TJ Louderback.

"With the federal and state incentives, our solar project became a very reasonable proposition and will provide significant savings and improved cash flow immediately. These savings will help us continue to provide our customers with superior service as well as quality jobs with great benefits for our employees."

The system was financed entirely through loans and incentives, including approximately $2.9 million in tax credits and state subsidies over the next six years. Sunlight Electric's CEO Rob Erlichman estimates that the system will save Bay Area Beverage $171,000 in electricity costs annually.

The solar power system will reduce Bay Area Beverage's carbon footprint by more than 905,924 pounds of CO2 per year, equivalent to the carbon captured annually by nearly 123 acres of forest.


NEWS 10:-
Rise Of Oxygen Caused Earth's Earliest Ice Age

An international team of geologists may have uncovered the answer to an age-old question - an ice-age-old question, that is. It appears that Earth's earliest ice age may have been due to the rise of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere, which consumed atmospheric greenhouse gases and chilled the earth.
Scientists from the University of Maryland, including post-doctoral fellows Boswell Wing and Sang-Tae Kim, graduate student Margaret Baker, and professors Alan J. Kaufman and James Farquhar, along with colleagues in Germany, South Africa, Canada and the United States, uncovered evidence that the oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere - generally known as the Great Oxygenation Event - coincided with the first widespread ice age on the planet.
"We can now put our hands on the rock library that preserves evidence of irreversible atmospheric change," said Kaufman. "This singular event had a profound effect on the climate, and also on life."
Using sulfur isotopes to determine the oxygen content of ~2.3 billion year-old rocks in the Transvaal Supergroup in South Africa, they found evidence of a sudden increase in atmospheric oxygen that broadly coincided with physical evidence of glacial debris, and geochemical evidence of a new world-order for the carbon cycle.
"The sulfur isotope change we recorded coincided with the first known anomaly in the carbon cycle. This may have resulted from the diversification of photosynthetic life that produced the oxygen that changed the atmosphere," Kaufman said.
Two and a half billion years ago, before the Earth's atmosphere contained appreciable oxygen, photosynthetic bacteria gave off oxygen that first likely oxygenated the surface of the ocean, and only later the atmosphere.
The first formed oxygen reacted with iron in the oceans, creating iron oxides that settled to the ocean floor in sediments called banded iron-formations - layered deposits of red-brown rock that accumulated in ocean basins worldwide. Later, once the iron was used up, oxygen escaped from the oceans and started filling up the atmosphere.
Once oxygen made it into the atmosphere, the scientists suggest that it reacted with methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, to form carbon dioxide, which is 62 times less effective at warming the surface of the planet. "With less warming potential, surface temperatures may have plummeted, resulting in globe-encompassing glaciers and sea ice" said Kaufman.
In addition to its affect on climate, the rise in oxygen stimulated the rise in stratospheric ozone, our global sunscreen. This gas layer, which lies between 12 and 30 miles above the surface, decreased the amount of damaging ultraviolet sunrays reaching the oceans, allowing photosynthetic organisms that previously lived deeper down, to move up to the surface, and hence increase their output of oxygen, further building up stratospheric ozone.
"New oxygen in the atmosphere would also have stimulated weathering processes, delivering more nutrients to the seas, and may have also pushed biological evolution towards eukaryotes, which require free oxygen for important biosynthetic pathways," said Kaufman.
The result of the Great Oxidation Event, according to Kaufman and his colleagues, was a complete transformation of Earth's atmosphere, of its climate, and of the life that populated its surface. The study is published in the May issue of Geology.


NEWS 11:-
Captive Flight Test Moves NLOS-LS Closer To US Navy Live Fire Testing

NetFires has conducted the second captive flight test of the Non Line-of-Sight-Launch System Precision Attack Missile (PAM).
NLOS-LS provides the warfighter with immediate, precise and responsive fires on high-payoff targets with real-time target acquisition and battle effects. It is also one of the key Littoral Combat Ship mission modules.
"As a key part of the LCS 'layered' surface warfare capability, NLOS-LS counters the small-boat threat," said Capt. Mike Good, US Navy program manager for the Littoral Combat Ship Mission Modules.
"The success of this captive flight test increases our confidence in the over-water capability of these missiles. Combined with the recent successful US Army guided tests, these are important steps toward the Navy-guided flight tests scheduled for later this year."
The LCS Mission Module can fire as many as 45 NLOS-LS PAM missiles from three container launch units. With a range greater than 25 miles, the PAM missile gives the LCS an increased surface warfare weapon capability.
"These tests prove the plug-and-play missile seeker ability to detect and track targets while filling the warfighter's capability gap for precision engagement of moving and stationary targets in open and complex terrain," said Scott Speet, executive vice president of NetFires LLC and Raytheon's NLOS-LS program director.


NEWS 12:-
Raytheon Awarded Contract For Additional Patriot Pure Fleet Upgrades

Raytheon has been awarded a new contract to continue "Pure Fleet" upgrades of US Army Patriot Air and Missile Defense Systems.
The US Army Aviation and Missile Command contract provides $115 million to upgrade four additional US Army Patriot Air and Missile Defense Systems to Configuration-3 status. The upgrades involve enhancements to Patriot system ground components, particularly the radar.
The contract option supports a "Grow the Army" initiative of equipping an additional Patriot battalion with a state-of-the-art Configuration-3 Patriot system.
"This contract is significant for two reasons," said Joseph "Skip" Garrett, vice president and deputy for Patriot Programs at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems (IDS). "Continuing Pure Fleet upgrades ensures our warfighters have the latest and best technology to meet evolving threats.
"Equipping a new Patriot battalion with a Configuration-3 system provides the Army with additional capability and flexibility to meet air defense requirements wherever needed," Garrett said. "Both the upgrades and the addition of a new Configuration-3 battalion are extremely important."
Raytheon IDS is the prime contractor for both domestic and international Patriot Air and Missile Defense Systems and systems integrator for Patriot Advanced Capability-3 missiles.


NEWS 13:-
LockMart F-35 CatBIRD Shows Key Avionics Capability And Reliability


The Lockheed Martin Joint Strike Fighter Cooperative Avionics Test Bed ("CATBird") aircraft recently completed a two-week deployment to Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., where it demonstrated the robust qualities of avionics systems being developed for the F-35 Lightning II.
The deployment included successful airborne testing of the F-35 Lightning II radar, electronic warfare and communications/navigation/identification systems and more than 2.8 million lines of mission systems flight software. The testing reduces hardware and software risks that cannot be retired in ground laboratories and individual sensor test beds before testing of the first mission systems equipped F-35 aircraft later this year.
CATBird, a highly modified 737 airliner equipped with the integrated F-35 mission systems suite, left for Edwards on April 14 and returned to Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth plant as planned on April 24. During the deployment, CATBird conducted 10 mission systems test flights successfully evaluating the radar, CNI, and EW infrastructure and sensor function.
The joint industry/government F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB provided logistic support, ranges, and ground and air targets.
"Performance of the aircraft infrastructure and on-board sensors exceeded my expectations and gives the test team added confidence that we are on track to fly the first mission systems F-35 aircraft this summer," said Doug Pearson, Lockheed Martin vice president of the F-35 Integrated Test Force. "The deployment was superbly supported by the Air Force Flight Test Center."
Airborne avionics testing aboard the CATBird and other flying test beds is under way concurrently with ongoing validation in ground-based laboratories that has amassed tens of thousands of hours of testing time.
The F-35 will have the most comprehensive and powerful avionics suite of any fighter in history, with a Northrop Grumman active electronically scanned array radar, electro-optical distributed aperture system and CNI system; a Lockheed Martin electro-optical targeting system; a BAE Systems electronic warfare system; and other advanced systems providing information that is totally integrated before being presented to the pilot on a VSI helmet-mounted display and a touch-screen glass cockpit display.
The F-35 is a supersonic, multi-role, 5th generation stealth fighter. Three variants derived from a common design, developed together and using the same sustainment infrastructure worldwide will replace at least 13 types of aircraft for 11 nations initially, making the Lightning II the most cost-effective fighter program in history.


NEWS 14:-
'Star Trek' Has Galactic $76.5M Opening Weekend

"Star Trek" beamed itself up to the top of the box office, earning $76.5 million in its opening weekend. Paramount Pictures had estimated that the movie would make about $50 million for the weekend, but figured that strong reviews helped carry it to the bigger opening.
Director J.J. Abrams' reboot of the beloved sci-fi franchise made $72.5 million from Friday through Sunday, plus $4 million just in pre-midnight screenings Thursday, the studio said Saturday. That cumulative figure includes a record $8.2 million in IMAX showings.
"Star Trek," which reveals the back stories of Capt. Kirk, Mr. Spock and the rest of the crew of the USS. Enterprise, is an unusual blockbuster that pleased critics, too, receiving 96 per cent positive reviews on the Rotten Tomatoes Web site.
"Last year 'The Dark Knight' and 'Iron Man' both were embraced by critics as incredible filmmaking as well as big action-adventure movies. This one has been even better reviewed," said Paramount vice chairman Rob Moore. "You look at the level of critical response and the audience reaction, we definitely feel like the movie is set to play into Memorial Day and into the summer."
Moore said he expected the movie, which had a $140 million budget, should gross over $200 million total this summer, even with competition like "Terminator: Salvation" coming on May 21 and "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" arriving in theaters July 15.
Abrams got it right, he said, by appealing to both hardcore "Star Trek" fans as well as moviegoers who may not have been familiar with the 1960s television series and the many movies and TV spin-offs it spawned. It stars Chris Pine as Kirk and Zachary Quinto as Spock, and features an appearance by Leonard Nimoy as an older version of the half-Vulcan, half-human Spock.
"It just shows you how talented he is and what a great movie he made," Moore said.
"Star Trek" also beat the $6.3 million record "The Dark Knight" set in its opening weekend on IMAX screens last year.
"The DNA of this movie and the DNA of the `Star Trek' franchise work perfectly together and are very much a complement to what IMAX has accomplished," said Greg Foster, chairman and president of IMAX Filmed Entertainment. "IMAX was a company that had a sort of older-school, older-fashioned approach to things and we hipped it up and reinvented ourselves, if you will. That's precisely what J.J. Abrams and Paramount did with 'Star Trek.'" The fact that the "Star Trek" haul improved from $26.8 million on Friday to $27.4 million on Saturday is a good sign, said Paul Dergarabedian, a box-office analyst.
"Sometimes you will see a movie drop big-time," Dergarabedian said. "What this 'Star Trek' is going to have is legs, a rare commodity in this world where every week there's a new blockbuster."
As expected, last week's top film, "X-Men Origins: Wolverine," came in at No. 2 with $27 million. The prequel to the "X-Men" franchise, starring Hugh Jackman as the mutant who slices and dices his enemies with his metal claws, has made nearly $129.6 million in two weeks.
"It's the same weekend drop as ('X-Men: The Last Stand'), the last one. That tends to be what fan-based movies do," said Chris Aronson, senior vice president of domestic distribution for 20th Century Fox. "To have $130 million in the first 10 days is sensational. We think we withstood the attack of 'Star Trek,' if you will, and will settle into a long, successful run."
The week's other new wide release, the stoner comedy "Next Day Air," came in at sixth place with $4 million.
Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at US and Canadian theaters, according to sources. Final figures will be released Monday.
1. "Star Trek," $72.5 million.
2. "X-Men Origins: Wolverine," $27 million.
3. "Ghosts of Girlfriends Past," $10.45 million.
4. "Obsessed," $6.6 million.
5. "17 Again," $4.4 million.
6. "Next Day Air," $4 million.


NEWS 15:-
White House forecasts higher budget deficit

The White House on Monday raised its forecast for this year's US budget deficit by $89 billion due to the recession, millions of new unemployment claims and corporate bailouts.

The new estimate predicted a deficit of $1.84 trillion, or 12.9 per cent of gross domestic product, for the fiscal year ending September 30. It updated the White House's February forecast of a $1.75 trillion deficit, or 12.3 per cent of GDP.

The report may add to the political challenges facing President Barack Obama as he seeks to push through a new healthcare plan and other domestic initiatives.

White House officials said the gloomier picture reflected weaker tax receipts as the economy declined and higher costs for social safety-net programs such as unemployment insurance. Spending on government rescues for the financial and automobile industries also played a part.

While the Democratic-led Congress has approved the broad outline of Obama's proposed FY 2010 budget that includes initiatives on healthcare, education and other items, many lawmakers are wary about the deficit outlook.

Republicans contend Obama's agenda would sharply increase the size of government and add to a mountain of debt.

"It's clear that there is much more that we can do to protect our children and grandchildren from the unprecedented trillions in additional debt proposed by the administration," Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement.

The White House countered that Obama inherited huge deficits from his Republican predecessor President George W. Bush. The higher deficits "are driven in large part by the economic crisis inherited by this administration," White House budget director Peter Orszag said on his blog.

The report from the White House Office of Management and Budget also revised the deficit higher for fiscal year 2010, to $1.26 trillion, or 8.5 per cent of GDP, $87 billion more than February's $1.17 trillion projection.

NEWS 16:-
US soldier in Iraq shoots dead five comrades

A US soldier shot dead five fellow soldiers at a military clinic in Baghdad on Monday in an incident that the top US military officer suggested may have been triggered by stress.
US President Barack Obama said in a statement that he was shocked and deeply saddened by the "horrible tragedy."
The soldier walked into a center for soldiers who are experiencing stress and opened fire, killing the five, said a US military official who asked not to be named because the incident was still under investigation.
The shootings occurred at Camp Liberty, a sprawling military base northeast of Baghdad airport that houses thousands of US troops.
It was not immediately clear whether the victims were soldiers seeking treatment for stress or worked at the clinic, the official added.
"The shooter is a US soldier and he is in custody," said Marine Corps Lieutenant Tom Garnett, a US military spokesman in Iraq. US officials said they would charge him later.
Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the US military's Joint Chiefs of Staff, told a news conference at the Pentagon that the shootings had occurred in a place where "individuals were seeking help."
"It does speak to me, though, about the need for us to redouble our efforts, the concern in terms of dealing with the stress. ... It also speaks to the issue of multiple deployments," Mullen said.
"IN HARM'S WAY"
Obama said Defense Secretary Robert Gates briefed him on the incident, adding: "I will press to ensure that we fully understand what led to this tragedy, and that we are doing everything we can to ensure that our men and women in uniform are protected as they serve our country so capably and courageously in harm's way."
It was not the first incident of violence by US soldiers against their fellow troops in the course of the war in Iraq.
In perhaps the most well-known case, two officers were killed and 14 soldiers were wounded when a US Army sergeant who had converted to Islam, Hasan Akbar, launched a grenade attack at a base in Kuwait just before the 2003 invasion.
Attacks like the latest one raise questions about the toll that six years of continuous warfare in Iraq and nearly eight years of fighting in Afghanistan have taken on the US military and individual soldiers, many of whom have seen multiple tours.
According to the US Department of Defense, nearly 20 per cent of veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan report symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
The number of US soldiers killed in Monday's shootings matched the death toll from a truck bomb in northern Iraq last month, which was the single deadliest incident for US troops in more than a year.
Violence has dropped sharply in Iraq, but insurgent attacks continue and a rash of major bombings has raised questions about security less than two months before US forces are due to withdraw combat troops from urban bases.

NEWS 17:-
Islands top a global list of places to protect

Many conservation strategies focus on regions with the greatest biodiversity, measured by counting the number of different plants and animals. "Normally you want to focus on the most diverse places to protect a maximum number of species," said Holger Kreft, a post-doctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego and one of the two main authors of the study, "but you also want to focus on unique species which occur nowhere else."
To capture that uniqueness, Kreft and colleagues at the University of Bonn, UC San Diego and the University of Applied Sciences Eberswalde used a measure of biodiversity that weights rare species more than widespread ones. They carved the terrestrial realm into 90 biogeographic regions, calculated biodiversity for each, then compared island and continental ecosystems. By this measure, island populations of plants and vertebrate animals are eight to nine times as rich.
Their results, plotted on global maps, will be reported the week of May 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
The southwest Pacific island of New Caledonia stands out as the most unique with animals like the kagu, a bird with no close relatives found only in the forested highlands that is in danger of extinction, and plants like Amborella, a small understory shrub unlike any other flowering plant that is thought to be the lone survivor of an ancient lineage.
Fragments of continents that have broken free to become islands like Madagascar and New Caledonia often serve as a final refuge for evolutionary relicts like these. The source of diversity is different on younger archipelagos formed by volcanoes such as the Canary Islands, the Galápagos and Hawaii which offered pristine environments where early colonizers branched out into multiple related new species to fill empty environmental niches. The new measure doesn't distinguish between the two sources of uniqueness, which may merit different conservation strategies.
Although islands account for less than four per cent of the Earth's land area, they harbor nearly a quarter of the world's plants, more than 70,000 species that don't occur on the mainlands. Vertebrate land animals - birds, amphibians, reptiles and mammals - broadly follow this same pattern.
"Islands are important and should be part of any global conservation strategy," Kreft said. "Such a strategy wouldn't make any sense if you didn't include the islands."
Threats to biodiversity may also rise faster for islands than for mainlands, the team reports. Scenarios based on a measure of human impact projected to the year 2100 warn that life on islands will be more drastically affected than mainland populations.
"That threat is expected to accelerate particularly rapidly on islands where access to remaining undeveloped lands is comparatively easy" said Gerold Kier, project leader at the University of Bonn and lead author of the study. Expanding farmlands, deforestation, and other changes in how people use land are among the alterations expected to cause the greatest damage.
The researchers also considered future challenges posed by climate change and report mixed impacts. Rising sea levels will swamp low-lying areas and smaller islands, but the ocean itself is expected to moderate island climates by buffering temperature changes. "Although disruptions to island ecosystems are expected to be less severe than on the continents, climate change remains one of the main threats to the biodiversity of the Earth," Kier said. "If we cannot slow it down significantly, protected areas will not be much help."
"We now have new and important data in our hands, but still have no simple solutions for nature conservation," Kreft said. "In particular, we need to answer the question how protected areas with their flora and fauna can complement each other in the best way. The part played by ecosystems, for example their ability to take up the green-house gas carbon dioxide, should be increasingly taken into account."


NEWS 18:-
Scientists discover how smallpox may derail human immune system

In findings to be published this week in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists describe how they looked at all of the proteins produced by the smallpox virus in concert with human proteins, and discovered one particular interaction that disables one of the body's first responders to injury — inflammation.
"This virus that has killed more humans than any other contains secrets about how the human immune system works," said Grant McFadden, Ph.D., a professor of molecular genetics and microbiology at the College of Medicine and a member of the UF Genetics Institute. "I'm always amazed at how sophisticated these pathogens are, and every time we look, they have something new to teach us about the human immune system."
With researchers from the University of Alberta, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a private company called Myriad Genetics, UF researchers for the first time systematically screened the smallpox proteome — the entire complement of new proteins produced by the virus — during interactions with proteins from human DNA.
These protein-on-protein interactions resulted in a particularly devastating pairing between a viral protein called G1R and a human protein called human nuclear factor kappa-B1, which is believed to play a role in the growth and survival of both healthy cells and cancer cells by activating genes involved in immune responses and inflammation.
"One of the strategies of the virus is to inhibit inflammation pathways, and this interaction is an inhibitor of human inflammation such that we have never seen before," McFadden said. "This helps explain some of the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis. But another side of this is that inflammation can sometimes be harmful or deadly to people, and we may learn a way to inhibit more dangerous inflammation from this virus."
Smallpox is blamed for an estimated 300 million deaths in the 20th century alone, and outbreaks have occurred almost continuously for thousands of years. The disease was eradicated by a worldwide vaccination campaign, and the last case of smallpox in the United States was in 1949, according to the CDC. The last naturally occurring case in the world was in Somalia in 1977.
With the exception of stores of the virus held in high-containment facilities in the United States and Russia, smallpox no longer exists on the planet. Since it was no longer necessary for prevention, and because the vaccines themselves were risky, routine vaccination against smallpox was stopped. However, public health concerns regarding the possible re-emergence of the virus through bioterrorism have led to renewed interest in the development of treatments for the disease and safer vaccines.

NEWS 19:-
Brain's problem-solving function at work when we daydream

The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, finds that activity in numerous brain regions increases when our minds wander. It also finds that brain areas associated with complex problem-solving - previously thought to go dormant when we daydream - are in fact highly active during these episodes.
"Mind wandering is typically associated with negative things like laziness or inattentiveness," says lead author, Prof. Kalina Christoff, UBC Dept. of Psychology. "But this study shows our brains are very active when we daydream - much more active than when we focus on routine tasks."
For the study, subjects were placed inside an fMRI scanner, where they performed the simple routine task of pushing a button when numbers appear on a screen. The researchers tracked subjects' attentiveness moment-to-moment through brain scans, subjective reports from subjects and by tracking their performance on the task.
The findings suggest that daydreaming - which can occupy as much as one third of our waking lives - is an important cognitive state where we may unconsciously turn our attention from immediate tasks to sort through important problems in our lives.
Until now, the brain's "default network" - which is linked to easy, routine mental activity and includes the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), the posterior cingulate cortex and the temporoparietal junction - was the only part of the brain thought to be active when our minds wander.
However, the study finds that the brain's "executive network" - associated with high-level, complex problem-solving and including the lateral PFC and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex - also becomes activated when we daydream.
"This is a surprising finding, that these two brain networks are activated in parallel," says Christoff. "Until now, scientists have thought they operated on an either-or basis - when one was activated, the other was thought to be dormant." The less subjects were aware that their mind was wandering, the more both networks were activated.
The quantity and quality of brain activity suggests that people struggling to solve complicated problems might be better off switching to a simpler task and letting their mind wander.
"When you daydream, you may not be achieving your immediate goal - say reading a book or paying attention in class - but your mind may be taking that time to address more important questions in your life, such as advancing your career or personal relationships," says Christoff.


NEWS 20:-
Women who follow blood pressure-lowering diet have reduced risk for heart failure

Dietary patterns have been associated with risk factors for heart failure, but little is known about whether food choices can prevent or delay the condition, according to background information in the article. "The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet may contribute to prevention of heart failure in some cases because it effectively reduced blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein [LDL, or "bad"] cholesterol levels in clinical trials," the authors write. "This diet features high intake of fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products and whole grains, resulting in high potassium, magnesium, calcium and fiber consumption, moderately high protein consumption and low total and saturated fat consumption."
Emily B. Levitan, Sc.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, and colleagues analyzed data from 36,019 women ages 48 to 83 without heart failure who were participating in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Participants completed a food frequency questionnaire at the beginning of the study, between 1997 and 1998, that was used to calculate a score indicating how closely their diets matched DASH guidelines. The women were followed up from 1998 through 2004 using Swedish databases of hospitalizations and deaths.
During the seven-year follow-up, 443 women developed heart failure, including 415 who were hospitalized and 28 who died of the condition. Compared with the one-fourth of women with the lowest DASH diet scores, the one-fourth of women with the highest DASH diet scores had a 37 per cent lower rate of heart failure after factors such as age, physical activity and smoking were considered. Women whose scores placed them in the top 10 per cent had half the rate of heart failure compared with the one-fourth who had the lowest scores.
Previous studies have shown that the DASH diet lowers systolic (top number) blood pressure by about 5.5 millimeters of mercury, a decrease that might be expected to reduce the rate of heart failure by about 12 per cent, the authors note. Other mechanisms by which this eating pattern may influence heart failure risk include the reduction of LDL cholesterol, estrogen-like effects of some of the nutrients in the diet and a decrease in oxygen-related cell damage.
"In conclusion, greater consistency with the DASH diet as measured using food-frequency questionnaires was associated with lower rates of heart failure in middle-aged and elderly women living in Sweden," the authors write.


NEWS 21:-
Warriors do not always get the girl

"In 1988, Napoleon Chagnon published evidence that among the famously warlike Yanomamo of Venezuela, men who had participated in a homicide had significantly more wives and children than their less warlike brethren," said Stephen Beckerman, associate professor of anthropology, Penn State. "Our research among the Waorani indicates that more aggressive warriors have lower indices of reproductive success than less warlike men."
The Waorani are rainforest manioc horticulturalists and foragers. When the first peaceful contact occurred in 1958, they numbered about 500 people living in an area the size of New Jersey between the Napo and Curaray rivers in the Amazon basin east of the Andes. Their abundant resources often attracted outsiders, who were promptly killed if found. Warfare and murder were common among the Waorani, who are known to be more warlike than the Yanomamo. They practiced their violence on each other as well as on outsiders. Eventually, over a period of 14 years, the missionaries pacified all the sections of the Waorani population. Aggressive warfare and raiding are now almost gone.
"In light of the documented abundance of wild resources, resource limitation cannot be considered the cause of warfare among the Waorani," said Beckerman.
The Waorani Life History Project looked at how a man's participation in raiding correlates with his survivorship and that of his wives, the number of his wives and the number of children he produced and their survivorship. The researchers interviewed men in 23 settlements. They interviewed any man old enough to have experienced warfare before the pacification that could be found and who agreed to the interview. The researchers collected Waorani men's genealogies, reproductive history, narrative personal life history and warfare history. The raiding database contained 95 men. Beckerman and his colleagues report their research in this week's edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science online.
"Our sample of warriors includes both living and dead men," said Beckerman. "We ranked aggression by the number of raids they participated in. Our analysis is free of the problem caused by the inherent correlation of the warrior's age with both participation in raids and reproductive success."
The researchers found that more aggressive men do not acquire more wives than milder men. They do not have more children and their wives and children do not survive longer. In fact, warlike men have fewer children who survive to reproductive age.
Why do these results differ from Chagnon's and why are Waorani men so bellicose when there appears to be no benefit? The researchers suggest that while both the Yanomamo and Waorani's aggressiveness is for revenge, the Yanomamo's warfare cycles have peaceful interludes where warriors can reap the benefits and accrue wives and children. The Waorani men do not incorporate peaceful interludes between their aggressive endeavors and will even initiate an action based on something that occurred in their grandparent's generation. In general, the Waorani goal was to eliminate the other side.
Another difference between the Yanomamo and the Waorani is that even with chronic warfare, the Yanomamo population had grown over the two centuries before Chagnon's investigation.
"The Waorani, as far as we could tell, were well along in the process of killing themselves off at the time of peaceful contact," the researchers said.
Cultural differences between the Yanomamo and the Waorani may point to why aggression and warlike behavior worked for Yanomamo men, but did not work for Waorani men.


NEWS 22:-
Israel under UN pressure to back two-state deal

Israel came under pressure Monday to commit to the creation of an independent Palestinian state as the UN Security Council debated how to breathe new life into the dormant Middle East peace process.

The ministerial session wrapped up with the unanimous adoption of a non-binding statement calling for "urgent efforts ... to achieve a comprehensive, just and lasting peace."

It said such peace should be "based on the vision of a region where two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, live side by side in peace within secure and recognized borders."

The debate was chaired by Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, whose country presides over the 15-member council this month.

But Israel and the Palestinians did not take part.

"Israel does not believe that the involvement of the Security Council contributes to the political process in the Middle East," its ambassador to the United Nations, Gabriela Shalev, said in a statement.

"This process should be bilateral and left to the parties themselves," she said.

"Furthermore, the timing of this Security Council meeting is inappropriate as the Israeli government is in the midst of conducting a policy review, prior to next week's visit by Prime Minister Netanyahu to the United States," she added, explaining her country's decision not to attend the council debate.

In her address, US Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice reaffirmed Washington's commitment to the creation of "an independent, viable Palestinian state" and noted that President Barack Obama planned to hold crucial talks with regional leaders.

"The United States is fully and unequivocally committed to working for a two-state solution," she told reporters after her speech. "We share a sense of urgency. This is a moment that should not be lost."

And she gave a stamp of approval to the Russian-drafted statement that stressed the "urgency of reaching comprehensive peace in the Middle East" and said "vigorous diplomatic action is needed."

It also encouraged the work of the Middle East diplomatic Quartet -- the European Union, Russia, the United Nations and the United States -- "to support the parties in their efforts to achieve a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East."

A roadmap drawn up by the Quartet calls for the peaceful co-existence of Israel and an independent Palestine, for a halt to Jewish settlement activity in the Palestinian territories as well as an end to Palestinian attacks against Israel.

The plan has made little progress since it was drafted in 2003.


 


British Foreign Secretary David Miliband meanwhile stressed the need for peace between Israel and the entire Arab world as envisaged in an initiative first championed by King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia.

The 2002 Arab initiative calls for Israel to withdraw from all Arab lands occupied in 1967 in exchange for normalization of ties.

"Israelis and Palestinians cannot deliver this deal on their own," Miliband told the council. "Israelis need peace with the whole Arab world as well as cooperation with the Palestinians. Palestinians need support from the Arab world as well as compromise from Israel."

Miliband also hailed "the determination and fresh thinking of King Abdullah of Jordan" to advance this goal.

In an interview for Monday's edition of The Times of London, Jordan's Abdullah said the 57-state solution would see the Arab and Muslim world recognize Israel as part of the deal.

"We are offering a third of the world to meet them with open arms," he said.

Rice said the Obama administration -- which last week called for the Arabs to begin making "meaningful gestures" toward ending Israel's isolation -- "intend to integrate the Arab peace initiative into our own approach."

For his part, Lavrov said: "We actively support this kind of dealing with reality."

Obama has pledged to work vigorously to jumpstart the stalled peace process, but his efforts risk running into the hardline policies of the new Israeli government headed by the hawkish Netanyahu.

Netanyahu has so far refused to publicly endorse the idea of a Palestinian state, a bedrock principle of international plans to resolve the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Netanyahu is due to present his cabinet's policy on the peace process at a meeting with Obama on May 18 in Washington.

Meanwhile, Ban said "the time has come for Israel to fundamentally change its policies (of building settlements in Palestinian territories) as it has repeatedly promised to do."



NEWS 23:-
Eating fish, nuts and olive oil may be associated with reduced risk of age-related blindness
By 2020, as many as 3 million Americans are expected to have late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to background information in one of the articles. AMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss among individuals older than 65 in the developed world. Established risk factors include age, genetic markers and smoking (the only consistently reported modifiable risk factor).
In one report, Jennifer S.L. Tan, M.B.B.S., B.E., of Westmead Hospital, University of Sydney, Australia, and colleagues studied 2,454 participants in the Blue Mountains Eye Study, which began in 1992 to 1994. At that time, participants completed a food frequency questionnaire that was analyzed to determine their intake of various fatty acids. Digital photographs of the retina were used to assess the development of AMD five and 10 years later.
After adjusting for age, sex and smoking, eating one serving of fish per week was associated with a 31 per cent lower risk of developing early AMD. The association was stronger among individuals with a lower intake of linoleic acid, an unsaturated omega-6 fatty acid found primarily in vegetable oils. Eating one to two servings of nuts per week was associated with a 35 per cent lower risk of early AMD.
"In conclusion, our findings support the hypothesis that increased intake of omega-three polyunsaturated fatty acids and regular consumption of fish and/or nuts in the diet may protect against the development of early AMD," the authors write. These fatty acids may protect the eyes by preventing the buildup of plaque in the arteries or reducing inflammation, blood vessel formation and oxygen-related cell damage in the retina.
Joint effects of protection against AMD were suggested between the consumption of these foods and other factors, such as smoking, intake of unsaturated omega-6 fatty acids or beta carotene and the ratio of total blood cholesterol to HDL or "good" cholesterol. "These findings also suggest that an appropriate balance among various nutrients is essential for maximizing nutritional benefit," they continue. Further studies are needed to determine whether changing an individual's diet or recommending supplementation could prevent or delay the development of AMD.
In the other report, Elaine W.-T. Chong, M.D., Ph.D., M.Epi., of the Centre for Eye Research Australia, and