Built by Prince Azam Shah, son of Emperor Aurangzeb,one of the Mughal Emperors, in the late 17th century as a loving tribute to his mother, Rabia Durrani alias Dilras Banu Begum. The comparison to the Taj Mahal has resulted in a general ignorance of the monument. This monument is also called the Dakkhani Taj or the Taj of the Deccan

The monument's name translates literally to 'Tomb of the Lady', but has earned the nickname 'poor man's Taj' because it was originally planned to rival the Taj Mahal (but was prevented from doing so due to budgetary constraints--Aurangzeb gave Azam Shah Rs. 7,00,000 only for the construction, where Taj Mahal's cost was Rs. several crores

The Maqbara is erected beyond a locality called Begumpura. The Mausoleum stands within an enclosed area measuring 500 yards by 300 yards. The surrounding high wall is crenelated with pointed arched recesses on the outside. There are bastions at intervals, and the recesses are divided by pilasters crowned with little minarets. The center of the southern wall is occupied by a handsome portal entrance closed by folding doors which are covered with a running foliage pattern in brass. The structure is in the form of a hexagon and angles are ornamented with minarets.[1] bibi -ka-maqbara was built in 1660 by Aurangzeb's son, Azam Shah, as a loving tribute to his mother, Dilras Bano Begam. In 1720, Nizam-ul-Mulk Asif Jah, a distinguished General of Aurangzeb with the intention of founding his own dynasty in the Deccan, arrived at Aurangabad and made it his capital. He paid a visit to Delhi in 1723, but returned in 1724, Nizam Ali Khan Asaf Jah II transferred his capital from Aurangabad to Hyderabad in 1763

According to the "Tawarikh Namah" of Ghulam Mustafa, the cost of construction of the mausoleum was Rs. 6,68,203-7 Annas (Rupees Six Lakh, Sixty Eight Thousand, Two Hundred and Three & Seven Annas) in 1651-1661 A.D.